Symbiosis of Illuminated and Planted Glass Pendants

February 5, 2013 by

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Blown glass spheres hang haphazardly from the ceiling, tangled like vines, copper tubes looping around satellite white planters that connect them like natural roots.

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Bocci’s No.38 takes lighting to new heights, in a sort of surreal grouping of suspended planters and lighting elements which co-mingle to form a living indoor illuminated garden.

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Recessed opaque planter vessels within the large orbs contain soil planted with succulents and cacti, but can just as well be filled with flowers or small shrubs, leaving the interplay up to one’s imagination.

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Planter spheres randomly intersect and collide midair with others containing lighting elements, the electrical wiring obscured within the copper tubes that support the fixture’s suspension.

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Although you could use No.38 individually, it works well as a group in applications creating a horizontal spread of pendants and foliage, groupings where the copper can be manipulated between multiple canopies, allowing for unlimited configurations.

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Think clusters over tables in residential and restaurant dining rooms, accessory lighting in living rooms and baths, linear configurations over bars and kitchen islands, large groupings in private foyers and public lobbies, or as single chandelier creating a focal point, maybe as an herb garden?

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With N0.38,there’s a biological-like symbiosis between the planter and lamp orbs as light emitting from long life bipin xenon bulbs warms the miniature gardens, at the same time casting a glow to illuminate the surrounding space.

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