Growing Your Own Seed Money

January 11, 2013 by

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Money may not grow on trees, but you can grow money. They look almost like real pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters…but this money actually grows into something when you spend it.

Seed Money are hand-illustrated and letterpress printed ”coins” embedded with seeds and cut into, as the designer quips, tender for tending. The really cool part is they come in coin rolls for sharing and spreading the wealth.

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Coins say “In Soil We Trust.”

Designed by Oakland, California designer, Lea Redmond, Seed Money was first seeded through her second successful Kickstarter campaign, and are now for sale on Redmond’s website, Leafcutter Designs.

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No Just for Gardeners
From gifting, to guerrilla gardening, Redmond offers all kinds of suggestions for what one can do with Seed Money:

• Secretly tuck them into medians, public parks, or your friend’s front yard.
• Leave a few with your tip at a restaurant.
• Place them in coin return slots to surprise strangers.
• Leave them on sidewalks for people to stumble upon.
• Grow an entire backyard flower/food garden with the full set of coins.
• Send a roll to a politician with a letter expressing your opinion on agribusiness subsidies.

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Making coins from seeded paper.

Multi-Denominational Cultivation
Pennies: Mix of wildflowers including Black-Eyed Susan, Spurred Snapdragon, Shirley Poppy, White Tarrow, and Sweet Alyssum.
Nickels: Herbs including oregano, dill, parsley, basil, chive, thyme, and sage.
Dimes: Root crops including carrot, parsnip, and turnip.

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Quarters: Salad greens including bibb, Black Simpson, Salad Bowl Red, radicchio, and endive.
Buffalo Nickels: Bee Balm (aka Lemon Mint).

Go for it–this is the only time you’ll ever be able to get quarters for the same price as pennies: $15, in a cute draw string bag!

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